Best Evidence in Brief: Out-of-school time study programs improve results for poorer students

From experience to meaning...

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and this time I want to pick this study from this great newsletter (in which the insight hidden in the last sentence is also very interesting):

A project funded by the Nuffield Foundation in the UK looked at the effect of out-of-school-time (OST) study programs on GCSE performance in England (GCSEs are national high-stakes exams given at the end of secondary school).

Using data from the Next Steps longitudinal study of young people, Francis Green and Nicola Pensiero from the Institute of Education recorded the results of those who undertook their GCSEs in 2006. They found that teacher-led OST study groups were moderately effective in improving overall GCSE performance, particularly for children from disadvantaged and lower socioeconomic backgrounds. For children whose parents were unemployed or in routine occupations, an improvement equivalent to approximately two grades was shown on their overall GCSE score.

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