100 years of on the effects of ability grouping and acceleration on K–12 students’ academic achievement

From experience to meaning...

This new review study by Saiying Steenbergen-Hu, Matthew C. Makel, Paula Olszewski-Kubilius published in Review of Educational Research looked at two meta-analyses on ability grouping and acceleration and I am personally glad because the insights in our book are confirmed.

Abstracts of studies are sometimes not so good, but this is a clear summary:

Two second-order meta-analyses synthesized approximately 100 years of research on the effects of ability grouping and acceleration on K–12 students’ academic achievement. Outcomes of 13 ability grouping meta-analyses showed that students benefited from within-class grouping (0.19 ≤ g ≤ 0.30), cross-grade subject grouping (g = 0.26), and special grouping for the gifted (g = 0.37), but did not benefit from between-class grouping (0.04 ≤ g ≤0.06); the effects did not vary for high-, medium-, and low-ability students. Three acceleration meta-analyses showed that accelerated students significantly outperformed their nonaccelerated same-age peers (g = 0.70) but…

View original post 186 more words

Advertisements

Comments Off on 100 years of on the effects of ability grouping and acceleration on K–12 students’ academic achievement

Filed under personal

Comments are closed.