Does successfully improving students’ achievement test scores lead to higher rates of national economic growth?

From experience to meaning...

No, this isn’t a OECD or PISA-bashing post, but I found a new study by Komatsua and Rappleye via @cbokhove that raises an important question: does successfully improving students’ achievement test scores lead to higher rates of national economic growth. This is a claim based on research by Hanushek and Woessmann and is the basis for a lot of policy-influencing research and policy-advice by e.g. PISA or the World bank. But Komatsua and Rappleye argue now that this claim is maybe based on flawed statistics, as the abstract makes clear what it’s all about:

Several recent, highly influential comparative studies have made strong statistical claims that improvements on global learning assessments such as PISA will lead to higher GDP growth rates. These claims have provided the primary source of legitimation for policy reforms championed by leading international organisations, most notably the World Bank and OECD. To date there have been…

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