Do teacher observations make any difference to student performance? Surprisingly, study says no

From experience to meaning...

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and to be honest, I’ve skipped one because I thought some research mentioned in the newsletter wasn’t really deserving the label of best evidence. The new edition is better, although I was reluctant to share this study. Not because I think it wasn’t conducted in a good way, but because the results are in contradiction with previous research. Still, it is important to share studies even if they don’t show what you expected – or even more important if they don’t.

Check this:

An evaluation published by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) in the UK has found that introducing more frequent and structured lesson observations – where teachers observe their colleagues and give them feedback – made no difference to students’ GCSE math and English results (GCSEs are high-stakes exams taken in a range of subjects by secondary students in England).

View original post 156 more words

Comments Off on Do teacher observations make any difference to student performance? Surprisingly, study says no

Filed under personal

Comments are closed.