The state of the learning profession: Neuromyths and (lack of) evidence-informed practice

3-Star learning experiences

Mirjam Neelen & Paul A. Kirschner

Last month, the Online Learning Consortium published an international report titled Neuromyths and Evidence-Based practice in Higher Education (thanks to Donald Clark for pointing it out on Twitter).

The reason for this research is articulated well by Professor Howard-Jones in the Preface. He says:

Educators make countless decisions about their teaching and course design that are likely to impact on how well their students learn. At the heart of these decisions is a set of ideas about how learning proceeds, so it is self-evidently important that these ideas are valid and reflect our current scientific understanding. And yet, a growing body of research is revealing that many of the underlying beliefs of educators about learning are based on myth and misunderstanding – particularly in regard to the brain… With our increasing concern for the student learning experience, and our growing awareness of the dangers…

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